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20121201
20121231
STATION
KQED (PBS) 31
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English 31
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)
kurdish town is still trying to identify the scores of people who died. to japan now, where the authorities are trying to figure out how tunnel collapsed on sunday, killing at least nine people. huge concrete slabs in the tunnel smashed on to cars. that started a fire on the main route from tokyo to central japan. we report now on that story. >> only this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought -- early this morning, the mangled wreckage of three vehicles was brought from the tunnel. last came a small delivery truck. the driver had been trapped, but alive. by the time rescuers got to him, he was dead. the collapsed tunnel lies deep in the mountains of central japan, just to the north of mount fuji. it is part of the expressway that links tokyo to central and western japan. the tunnel itself is nearly 5 kilometers or 3 miles long. engineers are trying to work out what went wrong. what caused the huge concrete ceiling segments to suddenly give away and crashed to the road below 0-- and crash to the road below? and why had the tunnel past the city in best --
they've had a street party to celebrate. from its launch pad, the rocket shot past stock. and japan. both countries worry they could be -- shot past south korea and japan. both countries worry they could be targets. we were invited to visit. taken past empty fields, the first attempt at firing a rocket. the one we saw exploded minutes after takeoff. it was an embarrassing failure for the new leader, kim jong un. not yet 30 years old, he is the third generation of his family to rule. some hoped he would been our reformer. he is acquiring missiles and nuclear bombs. not feeding his people but trying to make them feel proud of their nation is strong with weapons powerful enough to deter any enemy. >> the united kingdom condemns this launch. it is a breach of resolutions, because it involves the use of ballistic missile technology, so we are summoning the north the nextbassador arabout step. >> no. 3 of's ambassador headed to london for stern warnings, -- north korea's ambassador headed to london for stern warnings. it is already isolated. its main ally, china, is unlikely to let you in
of "thunderbirds," has died at the age of 83. japan's new prime minister, shinzo abe, has named his cabinet. on foreign policy, he emphasized the importance of japan posting relationship with united states. relationship with united states. >> i spoke to president obama on the telephone the other day. we have agreed to work to rebuild our relationship. i acknowledge before stepping reinforcing our relations with the u.s. is our priority. as prime minister, i must protect our citizens lives with determination. right now, are fearful -- airforce are protecting our sea and sky around the island. japan's security is not someone else's program. it is the crisis we have on our hands. >> this is "bbc world news." mohamad morsi has welcomed the vote in favor of a new constitution and he has called on those who opposed it to join in a national dialogue. another army massacre in syria as another person the facts. seeing the army has deviated from protecting the nation. a fire has destroyed a fireworks or house in nigeria. it killed at least one person and injured many more. it quickly spread to other
, including japan. >> yes. >> rose: and how influential was that? >> it was life changing. life changing. >> rose: life changing. >> yeah. i had a small stint teaching english in japan and i promised myself i'd go back to japan to do it right and to absorb the food culture and to stay there almost a year. it changed the way i viewed food. food didn't have to be good just for the fine dining level and that was one of the misconceptions that i had about food that you could only eat well in fine dining restaurants in new york, for instance. and in japan from cheap restaurants to very fancy chai secchi restaurants everything was cooked with so much passion, a very ingredient driven and it was good. everyone cared about food. it was a cherished thing. >> rose: they love food in japan and they practice the art of cooking to a high level. >> rose: it's amazing. people that travel japan need to stay there longer than a week. they need go there for at least three weeks and soak up tokyo and other cities, osaka and tokyo. there's a lot to learn, particularly about food. >> rose: one of the things
, probably less so in europe and japan. but there will be a ripple effects. >> are you worried about it? >> yes. of course i worry about it. the u.s. is a big chunk of the global economy. it has often been a driver of growth. and to have that player virtually flat, if not in recession, would be bad news for the rest of the world. we do not need that because recovery is fragile. we do not want to have this knock on affect on the fragile recovery. >> what would your message be to members of both parties on capitol hill as their negotiating? >> i would say focus on the real issue. the real issues for me are the supremacy of the united states and its leadership role in the world. the u.s. has an economic leadership in the world. it is a safe haven. to make sure -- the uncertainty has to be removed. if you have dealt with your own issues, and then you can help and advise, and then you can encourage. if you speak from a weak position, it is more difficult. >> you have warned about the risks of political games. what did you mean? >> please try to take a higher view and look at the broader hori
has taken place. now, the night before i went to bed i wasn't thinking about japan. i wasn't thinking about nuclear power. and now it's all-consuming. it just seems like we're in a period of time that's volatile from a geopolitical standpoint. it's volatile from an environment, nature standpoint. >> rose: jeff immelt for the hour. next. >> rose: general electric is the nation's largest industrial company. it employs over 300,000 people around the world. it makes everything from aircraft engines to power plant turbines to medical imaging equipment. the company has evolved over the last decade over jeff immeant's watch. he has led a global expansion and shed once treasured businesses such as plastics and insurance. in 2011, president obama named him to lead the council on jobs and competitiveness. last month, the country created 146,000 jobs, exceeding expectations in the wake of hurricane sandy. further progress will be tested as the fiscal cliff deadline approaches without a deal inside yet. i'm very pleased to have jeff immelt back on this program. welcome >> charlie, thanks, good to
finance minister. >> reporter: the parliament of japan has elected shinzo abe as the country's seventh prime minister in six years. abe was sworn in today after being chosen by his conservative-leaning liberal democratic party. the party won power in this month's elections, for the first time since 2009. abe has called for bold measures to bolster japan's ailing economy. he previously served as prime minister from 2006 to 2007. russian lawmakers gave final approval today to a ban on americans adopting russian children. it's part of a series of reactions to a u.s. sanctions law targeting russian human rights abusers. in washington today, a state department spokesman called the ban misguided. and adoption groups in moscow said it would harm children most. >> ( translated ): today we don't have that number of russian families who are willing to adopt, and the children who go to adopted families abroad are the children that russian families wouldn't take. there must be at least five refusals by russian families for the child to go to foreign parents. for that reason i don't see within this
beyond to east of taiwan and japan and so on, first island chain they call it and they are developing specific capabilities to do that, highly accurate cruise and ballistic missiles that could potentially put our aircraft carriers at risk and building a lot of diesel and nuclear submarines, they have clearly been working on cyber and they have clearly been working on anti-satellite capabilities so those are some of the focused areas in which they are trying to be able to make, take advantage of our vulnerabilities. i worry that if their economy -- well, let me say, i think the only source of legitimacy for that regime is a steadily improving standard of living. if their economy begins to slow down and they can't do that, there is a lot of unrest in china today. i mean just to take one example, in social media, you know, there are thousands and thousands of demonstrations and riots in china every year, many of them in rural areas, well to paraphrase the old ad, it used to be that what happened this the village stayed in the village. >> rose: nobody knew? >> nobody knew, but now, it is
to become greece but it is not hyperbole to compare us to japan and wonder if we get stuck in this slow growth quagmire. europe might be even more in danger of that. >> rose: okay. let's stop right there. do you think that we are at risk of getting stuck in the slow growth quagmire that japan got stuck in, the united states economy? >> well, i would say we are in a mild version of it now, and, you know, we need to do improvements and reforms. i don't think spending money is the solution. there are smart ways to spend it for sure, but i don't buy this idea that bigger keynesian stimulus will solve our problems, these fundamental problems with demographics, with slowing innovation, and other things we are experiencing. i think we need more fundamental reform and my colleagues like paul krugman will say, you know, i hear that all the time but i really want to see -- i want to see stimulus now, and i think we have been doing this for a long time, we are doing it at seven percent of gdp at the moment, and i think it is sensible to try to slowly rein it in. >> rose: so what should be the perc
and japan and all these countries start making stuff cheaper, it is problem for unions, and that is just a reality. >> it is also reality that some of that manufacturing is coming back, and not because of low wages. because of transportation costs, innovation, all kinds of things. what bothers me about this vote is that it was bought and paid for by a few wealthy people. the leader of the senate, the governor, both on record not want to do this initially . they did it turn around. and lost five seats and the legislature. >> you can look for all the conspiracy's you want. the fact is that michigan was adjusting to exactly the reality that evan is talking about, globalization. i think was glory days for the unions 94 is, 1950's, 1960's, when the rest of the world was devastated by the second world war, we had a monopoly and, yes, great benefits to it the problem is that when you have global competition, you are uncompetitive. detroit went bankrupt but the southern transplants did not. here is the tragic choice. in the right to work states, wages are 10% lower. unemployment is also 10% lowe
in 1932 -- in korea in 1932. when the north invaded, he and his family fled to japan. but in new york at the epicenter of new technology and ideas, that eventually became his home. and at a time when people were not expected to interact with technology, he invited participation. >> we have his random access, which shows the artist having read -- the constructed a real to real audio decker he invites the audience to interact with the trucks on our own with the device. >> why did he do this? and how is it relevant today? >> he was the first artist to the construct technology and give it back to west. it is a metaphor for what we're going through today with the internet and the technology that we deal with on a day-to-day basis. >> he knew that television would change the world. and his art embraces it, sometimes playfully, sometimes obscure. he defined a new visual medium that is now at the center of our to the 21st century. he was really the first person to use technology in ways that today, we take for granted. he predicted the power of television, how electronic media could bring us
is there was a sequence of transactions in a bank in japan in which they brought sequentially numbered travelers checks into this one little bank in japan totaling $290 million. no one seemed to have any idea where it was coming from. it all traced back to a guy in russia who claimed to be a used car salesman. >> woodruff: a used car salemans. >> with $290 million in sequentially numbered travelers checks. >> woodruff: isn't there supposed to be internal monitoring going on inside a bank? >> right. the basic principle is called know your customer. since 9/11 and since a whole bunch of other money laundering issues have surfaced the u.s. government has really tried to make the banks tighter and more careful in terms of who they're doing business with, who they're moving money for. what seems to have happened repeatedly according to the investigators in the h.s.b.c. case is no one was actually questioned. >> woodruff: now it was clear that the investigation on the part of the government has been going on for several years. what brought all this to light? how did it surface? >> it actually started in 2007
, and says he plans then to face election in his own right in 2014 for a full six-year term. voters in japan have chosen a new prime minister, shinzo abe. he led the liberal democratic party back to power on sunday, in a landslide victory. abe has pledged to ease monetary policy to pull japan out of its fourth recession since 2000. he also vowed to take a firm stance on territorial disputes with china. abe served as prime minister once before, but he quit in 2007, citing ill health. opponents of egyptian president mohammed morsi are sounding the call for nationwide protests again tomorrow against a constitution drafted by islamists. the opposition was bolstered after saturday's first round of voting on the document. only about a third of eligible voters turned out, as 57% approved the draft-- a much lower level of support than predicted. the second round of voting is saturday. those are some of the day's major stories. now, back to judy. >> woodruff: and we pick up now on some of the major questions being asked about guns, mental health and other issues in the aftermath of the shootings. we
europe and japan blew the domestics doors off. sales at v.w. were up just under 30%. while honda led the japanese pack with a sales increase of just under 40%. the car companies think super storm sandy pushed some sales the last weekend of october into november. morningstar auto analyst richard hilgert agrees sandy helped, but the storm wasn't the primary reason november was such a strong month. >> we've got a lot of pent up demand still out there-- pent up demand coming from, especially from the average age of the vehicles being over eleven years at this point in the united states. the average transaction price was up $346 from october because more 2013 models rolled into showrooms without incentives. the wild card this final month of 2012 is the fiscal cliff. analysts say if congress and the white house don't quickly resolve the budget crisis consumers could tighten their belts, throwing a speed bump into what has been an otherwise blockbuster year. diane eastabrook, "n.b.r.," chicago. >> susie: meanwhile, ford is going all out to rev up its upscale lincoln brand. the company is re
and japan, for example, do you think they are going to do it under these circumstances? we are looking at a tremendously difficult long- term problem, short-term problem, and immediate problem. >> actually, america is borrowing money at record low rates and the rest of the world parks their money here. i think we're in a strong position. i think the rational thing to do is to pass the legislation that the senate passed which extends the tax cuts for 98% of the people, then duke it out, and the fact that the claim bear of commerce and the business round table are all coming down on the president's side saying that they agree that the top rate should go up is a powerful shift in alliances, and i think the republicans are going to fold. >> i have to say one thing. the people who are buying our debt is called the federal reserve bank, okay. >> uh-huh. >> their balance sheet has almost quadrupled. by far and away they're buying 70 to 80% of our debt. that's where the money is coming from. they're printing money and giving it to the federal government. >> and the chinese are not buying as mu
and merchandising. three of the five most actively traded exchange traded products were lower. the japan e.t.f. had the strongest gains, up 1.6%. and that's tonight's "market focus." >> tom: while the economy approaches the fiscal cliff, some americans say the threat of higher taxes has them cutting back on spending. a third of those surveyed by bankrate.com have reduced their spending thanks to the fiscal cliff show-down in washington. those cutting back are more likely to consider themselves republicans or independent voters according to the survey. and while the tax debate is over high income earners, it's those earning less than $30,000 a year who are more likely to reduce their spending. we recently spoke with two behavioral finance professors about the impact the uncertainty can have for consumers and investors. they are professors at the university of miami. gentlemen, thanks for joining us. how do the fiscal cliff, the threat of the fiscal cliff, how could it be impacting consumer behavior? >> right now it could generate a lot of uncertainty in the minds of consumers. different demographics
transition. >> tom: there is a third party in this deal. and this is softbank of japan. sprint has agreed to sell 70% of itself to that japanese bank. what role did that play in this clearwire deal. >> well, one of the analysts summed it up best. he said softbank walked into this thing and said hey, listen, we know that if you had the capital before you would have gone and gotten clearwire. now we provide that. they see this as a big pickup. and they also see it as a first ingredient to turning this company around a little bit, to put them on track to compete more with t-mobile and of course the big guys like at&t and verizon. >> tom: to that point we have to talk about sprint shareholders then. what does this clearwire deal do to the outlook of sprint stock tonight, about 5.5 dollars per share? >> well, it depends who you talk to. the analysts in general seem to say well, it's going to be positive for the stock because now they don't have the overhang of well wa, are they going to do with clearwire. but they also have to look in the longer term what is this fourth quarter going to be lik
paint to china, japan, cambodia, vietnam. the driver? >> quality product for one and the second factor is that it's made if the u.s. that's what they seek. that's what they want. it's that quality. >> mike: what kelly moore seeks is the next great break through in paint. odorless, longer lasting, environmentally friendly. strides have been made in almost every area-- except one. >> it can't apply itself. that's something people always want it to do. >> mike: (laughs) >> it's-- a lot of it lately is about ease of application and saving time and time is money. >> mike: the color of money. always a good choice. >> mike: farming is a very difficult business and while technology and large corporate farms have made american agriculture some of the most productive in the world, small family farms are having a very difficult time surviving. unless they become very creative. how much passion, persistence, and profitability can you squeeze into a 15-pound block of cheese? at the petaluma creamery in petaluma, california, not quite enough of the last. why did you buy it? >> i wanted to saving a w
is in recession, japan continues to languish and yet the u.s. economy has shown resiliency but it is not immune from fiscal shock and that's something i clearly continue to monitor. >> all right, joe, thank you very much for coming on the practical. have we have good news for the in you year. thank you very much. >> you as well. thank you. >> joe davis, chief economist at ativan guard group >> susie: still ahead, the top tech trends for 2013, or how your cell phone will become an even bigger part of your life in the new year. >> susie: a lot of mixed messages for investors today. joining us now to sort through it all, ann miletti, senior portfolio manager at wells fargo advantage funds. >> so, anne, what do you think you heard, the economist talking about a mild recession. are we in for a correction in the stock market if that happens? >> i think right now the market is trying to predict how long this uncertainty is going to last. so right now, you know, because the market is a measuring tool, it's measuring how long the uncertainty with the fiscal cliff will last. if it's short and we get a re
Search Results 0 to 30 of about 31 (some duplicates have been removed)